The NPR Politics Podcast (2024)

The NPR Politics Podcast Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

Political wonks - get wonkier with The NPR Politics Podcast+. Your subscription supports the podcast and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

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Every weekday, NPR's best political reporters are there to explain the big news coming out of Washington and the campaign trail. They don't just tell you what happened. They tell you why it matters. Every afternoon.

Political wonks - get wonkier with The NPR Politics Podcast+. Your subscription supports the podcast and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/politics

Hunter Biden departs from federal court, Monday, June 3, 2024, in Wilmington, Del. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Politics Roundup: Hunter Biden trial, congressional races

The president's son is being tried on federal firearm charges for allegedly lying about his drug use when he bought a gun in 2018. And as presidential primary season concludes, we turn our attention to the congressional races likely to determine control of the House and Senate.

Politics Roundup: Hunter Biden trial, congressional races

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Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., speaks in front of President Donald Trump during a campaign rally, Feb. 28, 2020, in North Charleston, S.C. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Trump still faces dozens of charges, but more verdicts won't come before the election

The state charges in Georgia are on ice as Donald Trump and his team pursue an appeal, with initial arguments set for October. In the near term, Trump will need to select a vice presidential candidate and Sen. Tim Scott is making his case with a $14 million dollar effort to persuade Black voters.

Trump still faces dozens of charges, but more verdicts won't come before the election

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In this photo released by the Taiwan Presidential Office, Taiwan President Lai Ching-te, right, shares a light moment with Rep. Michael McCaul, R-Texas after receiving a cowboy hat in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, May 27, 2024. Taiwan Presidential Office/AP hide caption

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Taiwan Presidential Office/AP

In the landmark bipartisan foreign aid package that passed earlier this year, there was money for two allies in ongoing military conflicts: Israel and Ukraine. But there was also money for the Indo-Pacific region. So why is the U.S. interested in the region and how is Taiwan involved?

US & Taiwan: countering China, protecting a democracy, securing shipping routes

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President Joe Biden walks along a stretch of the U.S.-Mexico border in El Paso Texas, Jan. 8, 2023. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

President Biden will temporarily bar most asylum seekers at the US southern border.

Following several record-high months for migrants crossings at the U.S. southern border last year, President Biden is taking executive action to swiftly deport would-be asylum seekers when the seven-day average of unauthorized crossings exceeds 2,500. It echoes past Trump administration policies and, pending expected court challenges, implements provisions laid out in a doomed bipartisan reform proposal negotiated earlier this year.

President Biden will temporarily bar most asylum seekers at the US southern border.

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A woman shrugs her shoulders outside a checkpoint as security is increased ahead of the inauguration of President Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021, in Washington. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Biden, Trump or the couch: hear from our focus group of unenthused voters

A huge portion of the American public doesn't like its choices this presidential cycle. So what will those voters do when they get to the ballot box? NPR partnered with Rich Thau of Engagious and Sago to put together focus groups and hear from them directly.

The Supreme Court is seen in Washington, Sunday, Sept. 23, 2018. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Roundup: Republicans Attack The Courts, Alito Won't Recuse Himself

Donald Trump, convicted yesterday of 34 felonies, held an event this morning where he continued his attacks on the judge who oversaw his case and the legal system as a whole. His allegations of a "rigged" process and politically-motivated judiciary have been echoed by Republican lawmakers of all stripes, in a major erosion of democratic norms.

Roundup: Republicans Attack The Courts, Alito Won't Recuse Himself

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Former President Donald Trump walks to the courtroom at Manhattan criminal court as jurors are expected to begin deliberations in his criminal hush money trial in New York, Wednesday, May 29, 2024. CHARLY TRIBALLEAU/AP hide caption

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CHARLY TRIBALLEAU/AP

Donald Trump Guilty On All Counts In New York Criminal Trial

Former President Donald Trump has been found guilty of falsifying business records to influence the 2016 election, a historic verdict as Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, campaigns again for the White House. This is the first time a former or sitting U.S. president has been convicted on criminal charges.

Donald Trump Guilty On All Counts In New York Criminal Trial

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President Joe Biden speaks at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, in Greensboro, N.C., Thursday, April 14, 2022 Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

President Biden continues Democrats' long pursuit to win North Carolina

North Carolina is a purple state with a Democratic governor and a closely-divided, Republican-controlled statehouse. But Democrats have struggled to win presidential elections in that state since Barack Obama won there in 2008. That hasn't stopped the Biden campaign from investing there.

President Biden continues Democrats' long pursuit to win North Carolina

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Smoke rises following an Israeli airstrike on buildings near the separating wall between Egypt and Rafah, southern Gaza Strip, Tuesday, May 7, 2024. Ramez Habboub/AP hide caption

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Ramez Habboub/AP

Does Biden have a "red line" on Israel's actions in Gaza?

President Biden's steadfast commitment to Israel in the wake of the Oct. 7 attack by Hamas hasn't changed, even as the civilian death toll tops 35,000, according to Gaza's Health Ministry. That is in contrast to many of his fellow world leaders — and to many of his own voters.

Does Biden have a "red line" on Israel's actions in Gaza?

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Voters fill out their ballots at a polling place, Feb. 29, 2020, in Charleston, S.C. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Encore: NPR's Electoral College Map Analysis

The 2024 presidential race will come down to two key regions: the industrial Midwest and the Sun Belt, The number of white voters without a college degree is dwindling as a share of the total electorate, but can Trump's inroads with voters of color help him to make up the ground he needs to defeat President Biden?

Encore: NPR's Electoral College Map Analysis

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